Black Truffles

Black truffles are those of the species: Tuber Melanosporum; Tuber Brumale Vitt; Extra Melanosporum; Tuber Aestium Vitt; also Asian Tuber Indicum: Also known by the names of “Périgord Truffle” or “The Black Diamond of Provence”. It is harvested mainly in Italy, Spain, and France, where it grows under the shade of oaks, hazelnut, chestnut elm and poplar trees, typically from November to March, peaking in January and February. Gourmet Food Store

Sirloin Steak Mushrooms and Truffle Oil

Recipe from Napa Cellars

INGREDIENTS:

3 Tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
3 Tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon minced garlic
2 Tablespoons olive oil
¼ cup dry red wine
2 Tablespoons red wine vinegar
1–2 thick top sirloin steaks, about 1¾–2 pounds total
½ lb. very large fresh mushrooms (portobello or porcini)
Olive oil for brushing mushrooms
1–2 teaspoons truffle oil
1 Tablespoon fresh tarragon leaves, chopped

INSTRUCTIONS:

Mix first 6 ingredients in a flat non–reactive dish. Add the steak and turn to cover both sides well. Cover and marinate in refrigerator for several hours, turning once.

Bring meat to room temperature while you prepare a medium–hot barbecue fire. Quickly rinse and dry the mushrooms. Drain off marinade from meat and bring it to a low boil for 1 minute in a small saucepan.

Brush mushrooms generously with marinade and cook them and steak on the hot grill, brushing mushrooms with marinade 2–3 times more and turning both as needed. Mushrooms need less heat and will be cooked first; remove them and continue cooking meat until it reaches desired doneness. Remove steak from heat and let it rest with mushrooms in a warm place for several minutes.

Cut the mushrooms in large pieces (quarters if possible) and pile them irregularly on individual warm plates. Slice meat about / inch thick and arrange beside the mushrooms. Drizzle all with accumulated cooking juices and truffle oil; sprinkle with chopped tarragon. Pass sauce separately

Truffle

Considered a delicacy the truffle comes in dark or light colors. The truffle is the edible body of various European ascomycetous fungi.