Peking Duck Pancakes

Peking duck is a dish from Beijing (Peking)[1] that has been prepared since the Imperial era. The meat is characterized by its thin, crisp skin, with authentic versions of the dish serving mostly the skin and little meat, sliced in front of the diners by the cook. Wikipedia

Braised Duck

Duck that has been simmered in a broth, usually served with vegetables.

Peking Duck with Soy Sauce

Peking Duck is a Chinese dish consisting of strips of roast duck served with shredded vegetables and a sweet sauce. The meat is characterized by its thin, crisp skin, with authentic versions of the dish serving mostly the skin and little meat, sliced in front of the diners by the cook. Wikipedia

Duck Leg Salmi with Bilberries

Salmi is a preparation from classical French cooking. When a roast or sautéed piece of meat is sliced and reheated in sauce, the result is a salmis. Typical salmis preparations involve roasted game birds such as squab or duck. Wikipedia Bilberries are smaller and darker than blueberries, appearing to be almost black with a hint of blue. They are dark inside too, whereas blueberries have a pale green flesh. … Bilberries are more intensely flavoured than blueberries, but they are softer and juicier than blueberries making them difficult to transport. Swedishfood

Duck Liver Terrine

Fat liver production dates as far back as Ancient Rome, when birds were fed figs, and the method was so widely practised that the latin “ficum” is a root word for French “foie” or Italian “fegato” (both meaning “liver”). Until now figs or fig jam are considered good company for fat duck liver. Even though goose fat liver is also popular in some countries (such as Hungary), in France the duck liver prevails and it’s even difficult to find a goose liver, raw or transformed. Fat liver can be prepared in many ways, the most famous two being very simple, quickly fried hot “steaks” and more elaborate and complex “terrine”, usually (though not always) cooked in hot water bath, and served cold and definitely my favourite. The terrine is not difficult to make, but it takes several days, so if one wants to follow the French trend and serve it for Christmas, it should be bought at least four days before being served. – Farm and Forage Kitchen

Duck Confit

Recipie from of Jordan Winery – https://www.jordanwinery.com/culinary/recipes/duck-confit

In the Jordan kitchen, there is always a batch of this confit recipe in some stage of preparation. Whether it is showcased in risotto, terrines, cassoulet, rillettes or simply warmed through and crisped on the bone in a cast iron pan, duck confit makes for a versatile ingredient or main course.

Ingredients

  • 1 Tbsp Sarawak black peppercorns

  • 1 Tbsp coriander

  • 1 star anise

  • 6 duck legs with thighs

  • 3 Tbsp sea salt

  • 1½ Tbsp Demerara sugar

  • 2 bay leaves

  • 5 marjoram sprigs 

  • 10 thyme sprigs 

  • 3 shallots, sliced

  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed

  • 5 cups duck fat


In a large non-reactive bowl, combine toasted spices, sea salt, sugar, herbs, shallots and garlic. Press duck legs into mixture to coat each leg evenly. Tightly cover bowl and marinate in the refrigerator for 24 to 48 hours.

Preheat oven to 200°. In a small saucepan, melt the duck fat. Remove duck legs from the refrigerator and carefully brush marinade from the legs. Arrange the legs in a single, tight layer in an earthenware casserole or heavy lidded 6-quart stock pot. Pour the melted duck fat over the duck legs to cover and place in the oven.

Allow to cook gently until meat is easily pierced and nearly falls away from the bone, approximately 4 to 5 hours. Remove duck from oven, cool and store the duck in the fat. The confit can be stored for a minimum of one week and up to one month, but should be salted a day before you plan to cook it.